How to Handle toddler frostbite?

(June 26, 2010)

Frostbite In Toddlers

Toddler frostbite occurs when a portion of the child’s skin is exposed to very low temperatures for a prolonged period. In most cases, this is only a temporary condition but first aid for frostbites is essential to prevent permanent damage. Your toddler may seem relatively unconcerned but that should not fool you into believing that all is well. When frostbite occurs I, it causes temporary numbing of the affected area and so your child may just feel a little uncomfortable and not actually be in pain. It is very important that you stay calm, call for help, and administer first aid.

As soon as you realize that your child is suffering from frostbite, you need to make sure of the extent of the damage. For example you may treat the fingers of one hand that have been affected by frostbite without realizing that both hands have been affected. It is important to warm the area immediately. The numbness is caused by a lack of blood flow to the area and it is important to regain this flow or else there is a high risk of tissue necrosis. Tissue necrosis may necessitate amputation and so this is to be avoided at all costs. While we are all used to rubbing our skin in order o warm it up with the friction, this will not work in the case of frostbite as the cold have reached deep down through the skin and into the flesh. The best way to warm up the affected area is to place it in a tub of warm water. Make sure that the water is not hot but is rather just slightly more than room temperature. It is also often recommended that you swirl the water around gently. It is thought that swirling the water around helps to dissipate the cold more efficiently. The swirling water will also help to keep your toddler distracted. If your child has developed blisters in the affected area, make sure that you do not try to burst them. 

Keep checking your toddler for signs of hypothermia as this is a common problem that occurs along with frostbite since both are caused by exposure to extreme cold. The most common areas for frost bite to occur are the extremities. These would include the nose, fingers, toes, and ears. Make sure that you do not try to treat this problem by exposing the frostbitten areas to extreme heat such as from an electric stove or a fire.    


Submitted by P T on June 26, 2010 at 03:54

Toddler frostbite occurs when a portion of the child’s skin is exposed to very low temperatures for a prolonged period. In most cases, this is only a temporary condition but first aid for frostbites is essential to prevent permanent damage. Your toddler may seem relatively unconcerned but that should not fool you into believing that all is well. When frostbite occurs, it causes temporary numbing of the affected area and so your child may just feel a little uncomfortable and not actually be in pain. It is very important that you stay calm, call for help, and administer first aid.

As soon as you realize that your child is suffering from frostbite, you need to make sure of the extent of the damage. For example you may treat the fingers of one hand that have been affected by frostbite without realizing that both hands have been affected. It is important to warm the area immediately. The numbness is caused by a lack of blood flow to the area and it is important to regain this flow or else there is a high risk of tissue necrosis. Tissue necrosis may necessitate amputation and so this is to be avoided at all costs. While we are all used to rubbing our skin in order o warm it up with the friction, this will not work in the case of frostbite as the cold have reached deep down through the skin and into the flesh. The best way to warm up the affected area is to place it in a tub of warm water. Make sure that the water is not hot but is rather just slightly more than room temperature.

It is also often recommended that you swirl the water around gently. It is thought that swirling the water around helps to dissipate the cold more efficiently. The swirling water will also help to keep your toddler distracted. If your child has developed blisters in the affected area, make sure that you do not try to burst them.  

Keep checking your toddler for signs of hypothermia as this is a common problem that occurs along with frostbite since both are caused by exposure to extreme cold. The most common areas for frost bite to occur are the extremities. These would include the nose, fingers, toes, and ears. Make sure that you do not try to treat this problem by exposing the frostbitten areas to extreme heat such as from an electric stove or a fire

Submitted by P T on May 10, 2010 at 05:22

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